2.5 star review

Review – The Girl Who Knew Too Much by Amanda Quick

Girl Who Knew Too Much

When Hollywood moguls and stars want privacy, they head to an idyllic small town on the coast, where the exclusive Burning Cove Hotel caters to their every need. It’s where reporter Irene Glasson finds herself staring down at a beautiful actress at the bottom of a pool…

The dead woman had a red-hot secret about up-and-coming leading man Nick Tremayne, a scoop that Irene couldn’t resist—especially since she’s just a rookie at a third-rate gossip rag. But now Irene’s investigation into the drowning threatens to tear down the wall of illusion that is so deftly built around the famous actor, and there are powerful men willing to do anything to protect their investment.

Seeking the truth, Irene finds herself drawn to a master of deception. Oliver Ward was once a world-famous magician—until he was mysteriously injured during his last performance. Now the owner of the Burning Cove Hotel, he can’t let scandal threaten his livelihood, even if it means trusting Irene, a woman who seems to have appeared in Los Angeles out of nowhere four months ago…

With Oliver’s help, Irene soon learns that the glamorous paradise of Burning Cove hides dark and dangerous secrets. And that the past—always just out of sight—could drag them both under…

So I am still feeling blah, and this book didn’t help. Wasn’t even sure I would write a review, but since I did read it, and it wasn’t a re-read, I may as well.

I had hopes. Quick/Krentz/Castle is usually a sure bet for me, and the opening few pages which I had previewed seemed good. And the switch to a more modern historical setting could have been good. But after opening with a bang, we slogged through the first 10 chapters/20% of the book with a whimper…of pain…for me. It was so very boring setting up the characters and the setting.

And then once we got into the story, even though events ostensibly got more exciting, my interest never perked up. I didn’t warm up to Oliver or Irene. They were flat, and so I didn’t particularly care for their relationship or what might happen to them.

The mystery was crazy sauce convoluted, and absolutely no one was who or what they seemed. But since I neither liked nor actively despised the side characters, this did not matter to me.

Final verdict: If you are a die hard fan, pick it up at your library if you are bored and don’t have high expectations. Otherwise, maybe give it a pass.

The Girl Who Knew Too Much

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5 star review, Miscellaneous, Thoughts and Opinions

Random Re-reads: A Review January-April

I may not be reading anything new, but I am still doing quite a lot of re-reading (in fact a few books I have already re-read a couple of times just this year). And I absolutely adore that Goodreads tracks re-reads now. It is giving me some interesting insight. I base my grades on how re-readable I think a book will be, but it is absolutely fascinating just how many 3 & 4 star books I am going back to right now. Granted, many of them are 5 stars, but some of the ones I read a couple of times even weren’t. It makes a case for readjusting ratings, and I think I might do that for some of them.

Reread1Reread2Reread3Reread4Reread5

The overall theme seems to be laugh out loud until I cry, and/or women whose lives are awful outside of their own personal control. That is probably pretty telling.

And here are the 3 stars:

3star23star1

And here are the 4 stars:

4star34star24star1

So yeah, over half of my rereads weren’t even 5 stars. Maybe I just burnt out on rereading the 5 stars? Maybe where I am at in my life there are things in those books that just call to me. But overall, strong indomitable women, with problems that are not internal, and constant or near constant risk of death and dismemberment seem to be what is calling to me. That being the case it is no wonder only some tried and true authors are really calling to me.

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